Gen Y models with a keen eye for social issues

Gone are the days when a celebrities and models had to refrain from giving bold and likely controversial statements about social issues and institutions as their work depended on a social approval. Gen Y and Gen Z populous has nothing to do with that conservative school of thought.   Today we see activism and social…

Gone are the days when a celebrities and models had to refrain from giving bold and likely controversial statements about social issues and institutions as their work depended on a social approval. Gen Y and Gen Z populous has nothing to do with that conservative school of thought.

 

Today we see activism and social awareness surfacing more rapidly as compared to the recent past. Popular figures play a vital role in creating this ripple effect, but as we all know such moves are criticized and are said to have a negative effect on the careers of these celebrities. However this notion is becoming obsolete in our evolving societies.

 

 

We have round up some of the active voices in the fashion industry, who aren’t afraid and don’t believe in being a silent pretty face. They’re human, they are hard working women, they have a voice and they have a platform. So they will be speak and they will be heard.

Rehmat Ajmal believes in being the voice of reason. She has been active in the recent protests against violation of women’s rights, and her Instagram is an inspirational hub of issues that need to be registered.

Eman Suleman needs no introduction, she has been setting new precedents every day with her support for equality and justice

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Today, 6 pm. Liberty chowk, Lahore. See you there. Parh lijiye ga thora time nikaal kar. It’ll take 3 minutes max. Social media justice can only help a small percentage. Yes, it’s still progress but only for a limited number of people from a certain class. It does close to nothing for the downtrodden, those affected the most. It’s time to step out like many of us (but not enough) have been doing for decades. It’s our turn. We must try and do what we can, as little it maybe. I know it’s daunting, and I know we feel that we can’t do anything about it, we feel helpless, but we need to keep on trying. Ah jao. Awaaz uthao. Swipe right to see the list of demands. #timesup #metoo #ibelieveher

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This water camp isn’t for us so much as it is for the underprivileged. With the water crisis reaching critical levels in 2025, it’s not going to affect us as much as those that live close to and below the poverty line. We have the money, and thus the water and the means to access it. We are secure. The people who are going to suffer the most are those that take care of us, give us the comfort, and constantly remind us of our privilege, ‘look at them and be grateful,’ . Proletariat is a word that’s often used for them – I prefer working class. The former is hard to pronounce and spell. These are the people who cook our food, wash our sometimes filthy clothes, stitch them, clean our bathroom, our commode; they are the ones who are going to face the severest consequences of this water shortage. I think it’s wrong for me to say that it’s not going to affect us, we are not all very rich, for the middle class, the money we could have spent on a new outfit will now have to go to some privatised company for water. Might have to exchange the big car for a smaller one. So yes, in some sense this is also for us, but it’s largely for those that don't have the luxury to easily sacrifice the comforts we take for granted. It is said, 40% of the deaths in Pakistan are attributed to water borne diseases – in other words a lot of people ranging from infancy to age old age die from drinking polluted water. Another issue, who’s polluting these waters and why aren’t they being held accountable? The private and public industries dumping their waste into water. Let’s build roads, who needs clean water? What is being done to preserve water? What is going to happen when something as essential as water becomes scant? These are the questions that the government needs to answer. We have recognised the problem and now we must find the solution. They must find a solution and inform us. What are the ones who can help doing for those who need it? This. Join us @haqooq_e_khalq_movement for our protest camp tomorrow, 1st July in front of Lahore Press Club. We insist that you come and participate, the more people attend, the stronger this point can be made. Thank you. Link in bio.

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Farwa Kazmi also shared her thoughts on the discrimination prevailing in this notorious industry, as these models experience these incidences first hand.

 

 

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😏🙄

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Saheefa Jabbar Khattak is always found questioning the norms and making a very clear statements against them. With her following, we believe the impact is definitely making a difference

 

Zara Peerzada also doesn’t hold back when it comes to questioning societal norms that need changing!

 

 

 

Rubab Ali, another model who speaks up about social issues.

 

All around the world today, people are using their voice for a positive change and we take pride in these women to be practicing and raising awareness on pressing issues in our society. They are a force to be reckoned with, and we stand with them. Kudos girls!

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